10 THINGS YOU NEED TO BE WATCHING RIGHT NOW 
JUNE 3RD 2020

With everything going on right now, there has never been a more important time to immerse yourself in the Black Lives Matter movement. We have compiled a list of important films and documentaries that we feel everybody should be watching right now. 

1. WHEN THEY SEE US

When They See Us is a 2019 American drama web television miniseries created, co-written, and directed by Ava DuVernay for Netflix, that premiered in four parts on May 31, 2019. It is based on events of the 1989 Central Park jogger case and explores the lives and families of the five male suspects who were falsely accused then prosecuted on charges related to the rape and assault of a woman in Central Park, New York City. In one of the most heart wrenching stories, this series explores the reality of police brutality and racism. 

2. 13TH

Another one directed by the legendary Ava DuVernay, 13th is a 2016 American documentary that explores the "intersection of race, justice, and mass incarceration in the United States;" it is titled after the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, adopted in 1865, which abolished slavery throughout the United States and ended involuntary servitude except as a punishment for conviction of a crime.

3. THE DEATH AND LIFE OF MARSHA P. JOHNSON

One of the most important figures in queer history, black trans woman Marsha P Johnson, is explored in a story of hope, heartbreak and the continued fight for equality and justice. 

4. TEACH US ALL

Exploring the injustice's within the education system in America and the racial bigotry and abuse many young black lives have to be subjected to. Filled with hope, heart ache and despair, this is definitely one of the most important documentaries made. 

5. TIME: THE KALIEF BROWDER STORY

Time: The Kalief Browder Story is a six-episode American documentary television series that recounts the devastating story of Kalief Browder, a Bronx high school student who was imprisoned for three years, two of them in solitary confinement on Rikers Island, without being convicted of a crime.

6. SAY HER NAME: THE LIFE AND DEATH OF SANDRA BLAND

One of the most tragic stories in history, Sandra Bland was a 28 year old black woman who was found dead in her jail cell after being arrested 3 days prior for no valid reason. Bland's story is honoured and remembered throughout the documentary as it captures the beautiful person she was and the disgusting injustice she was met with. 

7. STRONG ISLAND

Strong Island is an American 2017 true-crime documentary film directed by Yance Ford. The film centers on the April 1992 murder of Ford's brother William, a 24-year-old African-American teacher in New York, who was killed by Mark P. Reilly, a 19-year-old white chop shop mechanic. An all-white grand jury in Suffolk County declined to indict his killer, who claimed self-defense in one of the most high profile cases of racist injustice. 

8. RODNEY KING

Rodney King is one of the most heartbreaking stories in modern history, being met with an all too familiar feeling story of police brutality, racial injustice and white supremacist discrimination. 

9. BALTIMORE RISING

Baltimore Rising is a 2017 documentary on the protests in Baltimore after the death of Freddie Gray. It was created, directed, and produced by actor and filmmaker Sonja Sohn and HBO Films. It covers the death of Freddie Gray, the protests and riots immediately following, efforts to keep the peace during the unsuccessful prosecutions of the six police officers involved, as well as efforts to change policing by both the Maryland General Assembly and the US Department of Justice. It includes segments covering the perspective of Black Lives Matter protesters, community leaders, and members of the Baltimore Police Department.

10.WHOSE STREETS?

Whose Streets? is a 2017 American documentary film about the killing of Michael Brown and the Ferguson uprising. Directed by Sabaah Folayan and co-directed by Damon Davis, Whose Streets? premiered in competition at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, then was released theatrically in August, 2017, for the anniversary of Brown's death. It was a nominee for Critics' Choice and Gotham Independent Film awards.